Friday, October 25, 2013

Museum of Civilization, Quebec City

Part of the Museum was closed when we were there, but there was still plenty to see. The first area I explored was Paris en Scene, Paris on Stage 1889-1914.  I particularly enjoyed the beautiful moth broach from Henri Husson, and a goblet by Rene Lalique made of silver and glass. Pieces of silver were cut out to reveal the glass and the whole thing was covered with intricate pinecones in relief. It was stunning. Unfortunately no photos as they were not allowed.  However, I managed to sneak a photo of this beautiful garment.  I didn't write down much information about it, but thought it so beautiful. There were many pieces from the Art Nouveau period.

The next area I went to was The People of Quebec Then and Now.  It was a great representation of Quebec from the arrival of Jacques Cartier in 1534 to the present time.  I was stunned to find how much I had been a part of the last part of the exhibition since I arrived in Montreal in 1967, in time for Expo, the start of Medicare,the speech by General de Gaul and the FLQ crisis.

The other exhibition that was going on was not really of much interest to me but it was Game Story - history of Video Games.  Judging by the number of people there playing Pong to the present day games, it was a very popular exhibition.

However, the exhibition I loved the most was Geometry of Space by Carolyne Bolduc.  I absolutely loved, loved, loved this exhibition.  Fortunately for me, the artist was there and spoke to me about her work.  She had taken the shapes from the surrounding roof tops and reflected these shapes in sculptures covered with a see through material.  You would go inside each sculpture and read a piece of poetry.  Another area had music playing and poetry that was spoken.  All in French unfortunately, so I understood the spirit of it if not the actual meaning.  The whole installation was on the roof garden of the museum.  It was a beautiful day and the flowers were out and the trees turning colour.  You were surrounded by shapes, music and poetry.  Her whole premise was that the sculptures represented the skeleton and she wanted us to go inside ourselves to find the poetry.  There was also a solitary maple tree turning beautiful shades of red and yellow where we could find solitude and have space to relieve the cares on our shoulders and replenish ourselves.  I just found the whole thing very inspiring.

Then we were rushing off for tea at the Chateau Frontenac! how much more perfect can a day be?!
Wendy
 
Dress at the Paris exhibition
 

 
The sculptures that you step inside to read poetry

 
The artist Carolyne Bolduc - notice the patches of grass

 
This is the area where music and poetry emanated from the surrounding trees.

 
The place where you can find solitude and replenish yourself.

Monday, October 14, 2013

Study Session 2013 - part 3

What's more cultural than taking an English High Tea in a French Chateau?

Leann walking on the Dufferin Terrace towards Chateau Frontenac...


The High Tea menu...

Tea selection...

and lunch...

l to r: Lesley, Wendy, Ingrid, Donna, Leann...

top layer of sweets...

middle layer of baking...

bottom layer of sandwiches (shrimp mousse, duck pate, smoked salmon, asparagus, cucumber)...

Delicious day!

Thursday, October 10, 2013

Study Session 2013 - Quebec City

The week we were together flew by, mainly because we were taking so much in! There are 29 churches in the old town, so they were an important part of our trip exploring history. Especially the stitching that the Ursuline Nuns were famous for.

The Holy Trinity church, one of the few Anglican...

The Ursuline Chapel...

The altar inside the Ursuline Chapel, the nuns are famous for their gilding of gold over wooden sculptures...

Marie de l'Incarnation - moved to Canada from France in 1639 to set up a girl's school - the first in North America...

A typical street in the lower Old Town...

The lovely roof lines of the Chateau Frontenac, a Canadian Pacific Railway hotel built around the turn of the century. (Open the link to read about the many across Canada.)

Articulation on the steps of the Frontenac(l to r: Leann, Lesley, Ingrid, Wendy).